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Learn "Fade to Black" Intro Solo with Scales

I am going to take you through every single Lick in this guitar solo.  But before we do that, there's a few really Core Concepts that I want to talk about that involve the solo mainly the scale the scale shapes some arpeggio shapes that we use.


Transcription

 Please note, this transcription was computer generated and has not been checked for errors.  However, I do hope you find it helpful.   

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Hey, welcome back. This is Jake. And today we are tackling some Talladega with the Fade to Black intro solo.

I am going to take you through every single Lick in this guitar solo.

But before we do that, there's a few really Core Concepts that I want to talk about that involve the solo mainly the scale the scale shapes some arpeggio shapes that we use.

So before we Dive Right into actually learning every lick, I really encourage you to stick around through these first few Concepts. We're going to go through to scale shapes to arpeggio shapes and one rhythmic idea if you wanted to skip right into learning the solo you And do that but I highly advise you spend the time to understand the theory behind these leads and that way you can apply them to your own solos. And that's what I'm gonna do at the end. I'm going to show you these Core Concepts that I'm going to show you what the beginning I'm also going to take to the end and try to make my own Kirk Hammett solo using the same kind of ideas. And I think that's a really important idea for you is not just to memorize solos. That's great practice. Yes, you should memorize solos but spend a little extra time to understand what's going on in those solos understand the vocabulary of what you just memorize Erised I think it's very beneficial and it'll shave off years of your practicing in your study. If you just invest some time really analyzing what you've already learned. Okay, so let's get right into it. The two things I want to talk about first are two different B minor scale shapes.

This solo is basically in the key of B minor. All right.

So there's a lot of ways we could play the B minor scale the two ways that Kirk Hammett chooses are as follows. The first shape is going to go like this. I'm starting on B on the low string which is my seventh fret and the shape goes 7 9 10 7 9 10 then 7 and 9 and then on the next ring. I'm going to jump back a friend. I'm gonna go 6 7 9 gonna jump back up a fret I'm going to do seven eight ten and seven nine ten.

So I want you to practice that up and down that entire scale shape. If you know all of those notes, then you pretty much know exactly where you're allowed to go for this first part of the guitar. Solo everything. He plays is in that shape. All right.

So once you're done practicing that up and down, I also want you to learn Earn this way to play B minor.

We're going to start on 14 on the 5th string. All right much higher and I'm doing 14 16 17.

Then I do the same thing on the next string 14 16 17 on the next ring is going to be 14 16 on the next string. It's 14 15 17 and then 14 15 17.

So practice that up and down as well and really get to know those notes. I want you to keep in mind. These are just two ways to play the exact same scale. Take a listen. This is B minor.

This was B minor.

So why would we go through all this effort of learning two different ways to play the B minor scale well in a Solo, you know, he's playing in one key and it gets a little boring if you stay in the same register if you stay on a bunch of low notes all day. So as a guitar soloist is a lead guitar player, you really want to have access to higher ranges and lower ranges, even though we're not changing Keys. That's really important. This isn't a new scale. This is the same scale is just a different way to play it and you can guess there's infinite ways to actually play the scale. These are two just very simple and convenient ways to do it for your family. Years, there's no big stretches going on here at all. All right, so there's your to scale shapes. Now. I want to move on to the to arpeggio shapes. I want you to practice basically an arpeggio is the notes of a chord played one at a time.

I've got a few videos on arpeggio specifically if you want to check those out but in this case, what we're doing is we're outlining a B minor arpeggio. All right, and to do that, we're going to start our ring finger on 16 on the third string and then I'm going to put my middle finger on 15, then I'm going to put my first finger on 14. So those three notes right in a row now my pinky stretches all the way. Out to the 19th for up. All right like that.

And then from there I'm going to do a pull off and I'm going to come back down those same notes and I want you to sweep this are I want you to do all Downs on these notes down down down and then I want you to do an up here for this pull off and then do all UPS pop up up up up. All right, so Downs up pull off up and that that little thing right there is what I want you to practice that's a B minor arpeggio and it's almost identical to what he does. Actual solo once you've done practicing that try this little shape right here. This is a D major arpeggio and he only does this very quickly, but I still want you to practice because you're going to see it all over the place. It's going to be 14 on the third string and then the same notes as before but our pinkies in on 17 instead. So it was 14 15 14 17.

All right, same picking Downs pull off and then UPS.

All right, so that's what I want you to practice all on its own this one B minor.

And D major.

All right, you should also practice these starting on the upstroke. So if I start at the highest note of the arpeggio, for example here doing all UPS up pop and then doing downs and then same thing here on this one.

Okay. So those are the scale concept that I want to know and there's one rhythmic concept. I want you to know here. It's pretty basic. So, you know, don't get too scared here. If you're not really familiar with rhythm, but it's this little pattern of two dotted eighth notes and one regular eighth note and you can think of that as being three sixteenth notes three. Sixteenth notes and two sixteenth notes and if you count that you could have one two, three. One, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three. One, two, three Dump Dump Dump Dump Dump Dump that pattern right?

There is the Rhythm pattern that I want you to learn. All right, it almost sounds like a triplet a triplet is three evenly spaced beats like this one triplet two triplet three triplet four triplet, but this is like a bouncy trip. That's a fake triplet. That's actually how I counted I counted fake trip. Let fake trip little punk.

Bum bum bum bum bum bum bum. It's not an even deeper. All right, so we're going to be seeing this a few times in the song and what I counted I'm not going to be counting one e and uh two e and uh, I'm just gonna count fake triplet fake triplet and it's just an easier way to count that Rhythm pattern. Alright, so now that we've gone through all this prerequisite stuff. It is time to dive into the actual guitar solo. So to begin we're going to take each little phrase real slowly and then we'll speed it up and gradually get faster at each little phrase. The first phrase I'm going to isolate is this guy All right, so to break that down slowly our first lick was this one and two and three and four and one and all I did there is I took my ring finger and I slid it up to nine on the 4th string my first finger followed up on the third string behind it on seven.

I squashed my first finger to hit the next seven and then I came back to my ring finger where I started and that Rhythm there is and four and one so I'll count right after the three beat one and two and three and four and one.

And four and one after that I'm going to start with my first finger on the second string. I'm going to do this little hammer on and I'll follow up with a pic stroke with my pinky on 10.

Alright & 4 & 1 2 & a 3 for the next part and a fake triplet three all I did there was a middle finger to hinky hammer on and I followed it up with my first finger.

All right, and then back down the same notes to the pinky to the middle finger back to the pinky.

All right, so that's and a fake triplet free.

So if I put those parts together, here's what I have and four and one and two and a three and four and a fake triplet three four again and four and one and two and a three and four and a fake trip lit three four.

Now this last note you can play it as a It's note with a really quick hammer on like that for a little bit of extra phrasing. I will say I am going to be removing a little bit of the original phrasing from the solo. He does do a few hammer-ons and pull-offs and spots that will take us out of the shape that I showed you at the beginning but it's pretty easy to do things the original way once you understand how it fits into the shape. So just keep that in mind that this is about one percent different from the actual performance our next phrase after we're done with that is this guy All right, here it is. Again. The timing is and a two and three and four and and a two and three and four and and what I'm doing there is my first finger on the first string on 7 and then I really quickly pick to my pinky on the second string but once I get to that note, I have to be ready for this little Legato move. This is all hammer-ons and pull-offs. I'm going to start with my pinky.

It's a pull off to my middle finger to find my first finger and then a hammer on to my middle finger and then a pull off to my first finger. So there was only one pick stroke there when I got to that 10th fret one picture. here All right, so it's picking 7 picking 10 and that's the last pick stroke.

All right until you get to the third string so + a 2 + 3 + + a 2 + 3 + + A2 + 3 and when you're done with that four and that's my ring finger on the third string and then back to my first finger on the second string. So the whole phrase and a two and three and four and and a two and three and four and all right after that. We've got a little fake triplet move very nice simple move here. We're going to start off with a Grace note on the second.

I hit the first note are my first finger and I very quickly hammered on my middle finger.

All right, so it's it's a hammer on so fast, you can barely even account for it and then I come back to 7 and then I come to nine on the third string I go back to 7 on the second string back to nine on the third string and then back to the first finger on the third string. So here's what it sounds like.

All right, and those are the fake triplets I talked about earlier.

They trip with fake triplet fake triplet fake triplet and end it with one to that was on the fourth string my index finger and then my ring finger. All right. So here's the whole phrase here starting with the fake triplets.

and again So if I come back from the beginning he really quick. Let's go slow. I've got and four and one and two and three and four and a fake triplet three and four and one and two and three and four and fake triplet fake trip with one two, three. All right our next phrase. We're going to take the rest of this section all on its own because it's pretty simple. It goes like this.

And in this case, all you have to do is really worried about the timing so I'm doing I'll start with this part goes 1 2 3 4 & 1 & and one they're all I did is I slid my middle finger up to 7 and then I pulled off to 6 on the same string now. I just do that pull off again, but I follow it up on the second string with 8 to 7 and those notes are both picked. So I've got pull-off pick pick.

That's seven six eight seven then the last phrase here is My middle finger on 8 sliding to 10.

All right, so I'm going to start here one, two, three four and one two, three and four and one two, three four and one two, three four. All right. So now is the hardest licking the entire guitar solo. This is the arpeggio sweeping thing. The rhythm is and a 1 E and A 2 E and A 3 E and A 4 1 and that's the entire phrase that we're going to take here. I'm starting with my middle finger on. Lean on the second string. I do it down there. I do a down on my first finger on 14. I do an up with my pinky on 19 and that's my pull off. All right. So right now that's just a down down up pull off after that. It's another upstroke to my middle finger and then another upstroke to my ring finger so that right. There is a good little place to stop and practice.

All right all downs and then all ops down down up up up from there. What I'm going to do is I'm going to put my Finger on the first string and that's going to be 15 and that's going to be a downstroke cause I just did an upstroke would be pretty awkward to do another upstroke here. So a down stroke on 15 and that's another pull off to 14.

So if I add that pull off to what I've got here is what I have.

Alright, it's pretty hard to get there in time. But down down up up up down pull off and then I'm going to do an up stroke to my middle finger and then upstroke to my first finger. This is at kind of in the shape of that D major arpeggio. I showed you at the beginning. I showed you this shape at the beginning and this is essentially almost the same thing just with our middle finger there. Alright, so here's what we have at this point.

All right down down up up up down up up. And now it's just an alternate picking passage right here up and down the scale.

And what I did there is on the second string 1715 14 then on the third string 16 and 14, but that 14 gets a big band with my index finger, which is hard. It's just your index finger. But since it's the third string or high up on the string you should be able to get the strength with just your index finger to then just that note. All right. So here's the whole banana. All right, check it out.

All right and a 1 E and A 2 E and A 3 E and A 4 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and a 1 E and A 2 E and A 3 E and A 4 1 and a 1 E and A 2 E and A 3 E and A 4 1. All right, that is a tough lick your definitely want to take that one all on its own and really isolate the practice in on that then, you know, maybe definitely practice it slow to if you And you know take that at that speed right now. You're going to do yourself some damage. So take it slow count through each note and then, you know gradually increase the speed going on. It's pretty simple. So I'll just show you this little move right here is going to be a hammer on on the third string from 14 to 16 and then it comes back to 14 on the 4th string.

All right. I'm going to start right there for this move.

And what that was was 14 to 16 and then 14 on 216 on the next string so duh, duh, Pom-Pom and then keep going up the scale to my index finger and then my middle finger.

And then here we have a little Trill.

Alright, that's my first finger to my middle finger and then back to my first finger one pick stroke.

Here's the trill and then back to my ring finger on the third string back to my first finger back to my middle finger back to my first finger.

So fourteen to sixteen fourteen to sixteen fourteen to Fifteen.

All right.

Now we're going to reach up to the dots on the first string. We have 1917 15.

All right that follows up immediately. We don't have too much of a break there. Listen.

All right from there. It's fifteen Seventeen Fourteen. And then we go down the notes of that B minor arpeggio.

So it's going to be 15 17 14 then down these notes. That's 15 and 16.

Then we do 14 15 14 again, but we go down the notes of the D major arpeggio.

All right, and then we do 14 15 14 again back to the middle finger to the pinky and then the middle finger and then the first finger.

Okay, so I know that's a lot. There's not a lot of breaks in this part of the solo after those sixteenth note parts. So we'll start at the at the very end of that arpeggio section. We've got this big band here and then it goes one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three four and one.

Two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and one two, three four. Now after that, you know, the B minor section the B minor scale, I taught you at the beginning it started here on 14.

We're going to just move it back to 12 and now we're going to play the a minor scale all the way up and this is the last Lick in the song. We just go up the scale at the very top we do this hammer-on and pull-off.

Move and then we come down to our pinky on the second string. So we have this Trill then down to the pinky and then you can jump the pinky up to 17. All right. Now you can guess it might be a little more efficient to use your ring finger there. I didn't teach you to use your ring finger in the beginning. But in this case if I use my ring finger, then I can get the pinky to that 17 a little faster. So the last phrase just goes one and two and three and four and one and two and three and Trill and end right there.

Okay, pretty cool stuff, right. So here's what we're going to do. Let's play the entire guitar solo at a slow tempo and then we'll take the entire guitar solo again at a slightly higher Tempo. And then if you can do that, you should be ready to practice with the actual song.

So if you can play that then you're definitely ready to start playing. Along with the song definitely isolate that sixteenth notes weeping part. It is definitely the hardest part of the entire solo. So if you can get good at that, I think the rest of the solo should follow pretty easily now. I want to show you what I did using the same techniques essentially just using those to scale shapes and using a lot of the trill a movie that we saw that little this move right here where we did a little Trill and then went back to the third string. I use that move a lot. I use these two shapes. I use a little bit of the arpeggio sweeping just like we saw Kirk Hammett and I tried to write a riff similar to what Metallica Would do but in this case I did it in the key of A minor. So essentially I'm just picking around an A minor chord and a G major chord and an A minor chord and using the a minor scale shape here. Just like Kirk Hammett did in this song and using the a minor scale shape here on the 5th string and I want you to hear how easy it is to you know, what it sounds like when you just directly try to rip somebody off and that's what I'm trying to do here is I'm trying to write a Ride the Lightning era style riff with a Ride the Lightning era style guitar solo by using the same elements that I saw. In this solo which was to scale shapes some arpeggios some hammer-ons and pull-offs and a few sixteenth note passages.

So thanks again for watching and I hope you enjoy this little solo to play things out.

 





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