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Learn Scale Degrees

Today we're talking about scale degrees. So this is a little bit of music theory here for us as the average guitar player who might be a little deficient in music theory just understanding something as simple as scale degrees can make a giant impact on your playing and also on how quickly you absorb new scale concepts.

Transcription


Please note, this transcription was computer generated and has not been checked for errors. However, I do hope you find it helpful. 

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Welcome back. We're doing another lesson here today. And today we're talking about scale degrees. So this is a little bit of music theory here for us as the average guitar player who might be a little deficient in music theory just understanding something as simple as scale degrees can make a giant impact on your playing and also on how quickly you absorb new scale Concepts because pretty much everything we talked about in music when it comes to chords and scales. We often use scale degrees to describe these things. So just understanding it is is a big piece of the puzzle as far as understanding and speaking the the Jacques Theory language, so what is a scale degree? This is actually pretty simple the only kind of knowledge. You need to the only prerequisite for this is knowing your major scale. So if you don't know your major scale, you can learn it here in just a little bit the way I'm going to be playing it. I'll do it here in G. All right, I'm gonna start on G and I'm going to go through my major scale goes ba BC.

So if I know that major scale that I'm ready to start tackling the idea of scale degrees and it's as simple as this instead of giving these notes the names of the letter of the No, G&A and me we're just gonna give it a number one, two, three, five six seven and that's it. All right. So when I'm talking about a to in music when I'm talking about a second scale degree what I mean is I'm going from this note to that.

All right, so it's basically just a whole step distance when I'm talking about a three I'm talking about this. All right. Now this might seem really basic but here's the deal in music. We often talk about things like flatted twos and flatted threes. So check it out here was my regular.

R2 it was over on this note. But if I flat that note then all of a sudden it's here remember flatting is to go down a half step. Alright, so here's a one that's my route. I picked G is my route today and here is a flatted to all right, here's my regular to their on a and then here is my regular three, but this would be a flatted three.

All right, and I can continue this with the whole scale. Here's my regular fifth of a major scale 1 2 3 4 5 I could do a flatted fifth one, two, three, four, five and flattened and I get this Asik flatted fifth the tritone wonderful little interval right there now. Why is this important? Well when I want to teach somebody a scale or when I want to talk about a scale I'll often just refer to it in scale degrees for example, pentatonic minor if I'm in G pentatonic minor I can spell that out just using scale degrees by saying it's a 1 it's a flatted 3.

It's a 4 a 5 and a flatted 7 and any musician will understand exactly, you know how to produce that scale when I just say I'll give me a one a flat at three or four or five and a half. I added seven. There's your pentatonic minor scale.

My minor scale itself. I could refer to my minor scale just might G natural minor I can say it's a 1 a 2 a flatted three a four a five a flatted six at a so by understanding this nomenclature in this language. You can get the point across a lot easier instead of showing somebody Frets or writing out passages. You can just kind of describe something to them even chords. I could describe something like a chord. Let's say I was in I wanted to play a G7 chord I could see a G7 chord Composed of A1 A3 A5 and a flatted 7 and that means it's going to compose the first note of the G Major scale the third note of the G Major scale the 5th note of the G Major scale flatted 7th note of the G Major scale. All right.

So this idea of scale degrees is very closely tied to the idea of intervals and music the idea of intervals is just the distances between two notes and that's essentially what we're talking about here, but we're really making a point to contact our to talk about how the distances from A specific note for example all these notes were in our example today from G. Right. So we were thinking about the distance from G. It being a flatted to in the key of G mean something different than just calling it a minor second interval, even though this is a minor second interval. And even though this is a flatted to those two words kind of those two phrases have different meanings depending on you know, the context of what we're talking about musically so it can get a little confusing but I would say there are two sides of the exact same coin the idea here of Scale degrees and the idea of intervals and as you understand the one concept better it'll certainly help you understand the other concept better because they're essentially the same thing. So this is a quick simple little video and I hope you learned something from it, but I'm probably going to be referencing this video a lot for people when I start doing more videos on exotic scales and different patterns stuff out of the mainstream. I want to be able to refer to things just to scale degrees and if you don't really know what a scale degree is, well, that'll make things pretty difficult. Okay. So if you have any questions, please let me know. I'll leave a comment down below like And subscribe that Actually makes a huge difference and I will plan on seeing you sometime soon. Alright, thanks.

 





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