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Tricks on One String - Cool Solo techniques

There's a lot of cool tricks and a lot of cool licks that you can play on your guitar that are kind of set up for one string. It's very easy to pick on one string, you know, you can kind of rest your pic here and just Blast away so we can use that to our advantage by learning scales on one string and doing fast things on that single string, but also when you work with scales on one string you get a very good grasp.

Transcription

 Please note, this transcription was computer generated and has not been checked for errors.  However, I do hope you find it helpful.   

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There's a lot of cool tricks and a lot of cool licks that you can play on your guitar that are kind of set up for one string. It's very easy to pick on one string, you know, you can kind of rest your pic here and just Blast away so we can use that to our advantage by learning scales on one string and doing fast things on that single string, but also when you work with scales on one string you get a very good grasp. Of the structure of major scales and minor scales and all the modes of the major scale. So it's kind of a two-for-one bonus when you work with, you know, these one string scale. So I just want to jump right into it here. What we're going to do is a major now, we could start on any a anywhere on our fretboard.

But today I'm going to start here on this a this is the second fret on the third string and what I'm going to do here. I just want you to follow along. I'm going to play the A and then I'm going to slide up a whole-step. Okay, I'll whole step is two Frets from there. I'm going to slide up another whole step.

I'm going to slide up a half step a whole step another whole step another whole step. And finally I have step and that gets me through my entire a major scale.

It's very important that eventually you memorize that sequence whole step whole step half step whole step whole step whole step half step that is going to be applicable for any major scale you want to do. So today. We're doing it now a but if you decided to start in D, we would do the same thing start on a note travel a whole step whole step half step whole step whole step whole step and then I have stuff and you now know every single major scale on one string you can already feel it hear. It sounds nice when you just slide up a scale like that. It's a very Legato feeling very smooth and flowing as opposed to picking through everything but instead of just sliding up the notes. I want to show you the specific lick and trick that I use which is just this I play a note that's a downstroke with my pick then I slide the note and then I do a down and an up on that new. No, okay. So it's a down slide down up then I do the same thing again down slide down up down slide down up down slide down up down slide deck the same thing in Reverse down slide down up down slide down up down down up down down.

And this is the kind of thing you're gonna hear a lot. I mean the solos that I hear off the top of my head.

I Love Rock and Roll by Joan Jett. You hear this little lick right there. You also hear it in I believe Blind Melon No Rain. Yeah, that's it. So basically, I mean you're going to hear this in common souls and it's very easy to apply. So to check this out. I'm jamming in a track in a major and literally all I'm going to do is go up and down using sixteenth notes 1 E and A 2 E and A 3 E and A 4 e and just like I AB by playing a note sliding it and then doing a down stroke and an up stroke and I'll be counting these two sixteenth notes and trying to phrase them a sixteenth notes and it's gonna sound great just up the scale and down the scale 1 2 3 4 Right, very nice. Now, what I could do is I could do a little variation here instead of just going straight up and straight down which is fairly boring. What I could do is start on the 14th fret and then jumped out of the ninth fret and then from there. I'm just going to do this pattern where I go up one note of the scale and then I skip down a note of scale and I go up one note of the scale and I skipped down go up one. Skip down go up one. Skip down keep just doing that back.

That's a little more interesting. Here's what it sounds like on its own.

And if I add the slide move in here 1 and a 2 E and A 3 E and A 4 E and A 1 E and A 2 E and A 3 e and then what I'll dry and do is I'll try and do that same move without starting at the very top maybe starting just hear halfway through.

And then maybe on the way up to so once again, I mean the thing I like about these things. It's I'm still only doing one lick. I'm still just doing down slide down up down slide down up but there's so many ways. I can translate that. I can skip around notes I could do this on different strings different scales different keys, but really quick, lets just hear what it sounds like over the same Jam track, but and when I start skipping things around two three All right lot of cool ideas there and obviously I mean unless you're really going for a solo is just saturated with this. I wouldn't just do slide moves. I would incorporate those into the rest of your solo playing. Say one thing before I talk about incorporating this into your other. The rest of your scale is also phrasing. This is a triplet instead, which is very simple. And all you have to do is do a down do your slide and then do one up stroke and then you're ready for your next down with a slide and an up stroke and then a downslide up down slide up down slide up down slide up down slide up and that gives you a three note phrase. One, two, three, one, two, three, one, two, three, and you can treat those triplet 1 triplet 2 triplet 3 triplet.

Triplet 1 triplet 2 triplet 3 triplet 4, I'll play that over this Jam. I don't know the song that great. I mean, I don't think this Jam is really set up for triplets. But at least you'll hear what it sounds like to phrase this over triplets.

All right.

So I mean I just want you to be able to practice that is fun all its own anytime. You're in a shuffle feel. A triplet feel you're definitely gonna want to have that trick up your sleeve. You don't want to try and cram sixteenth notes over a triplet feel. I mean you can but it's going to get a little little hairy if you do that. So the last step here is applying this to the rest of your scales. So what you have to do is have some sort of Home shape that you're hanging out on less. You're a master of your fretboard and you know, every single note which in that case. I'm wondering why you're watching this lesson, but really what I would do is find one shape that you're comfortable with. I don't care what it is. I'm going to use this a major shape.

A billion ways. I could play a major but this is the one I'm going to use. All right, and what I'm going to try and do is I'm going to try and you know play my solos in this scale. And then what I'll try and do is break into that sliding passage and kind of work my way around those sliding notes and then kind of come back to my scale work my way around and this way I'm busting free of the shackles of one shape.

It can be very limiting when you're working in guitar-shaped because you're just stuck there. But at least by learning this you're able to kind of Go free left and right remember that this entire pattern we talked about repeat.

Up in the next octave. So once you found it here on a once we work all the way up here, you can just do everything again whole step whole step half step whole step until you run out of friends. Okay. So what I'll try and do now is use my shape try and do some slides in hear how that sounds together.

One, two, three.

All right, first of all, so um, so it sounds good and what I want you to really remember is how versatile what we're talking about is this is the major scale and almost everything you're going to be doing most of it's going to be revolving around the major scale or derivation of the of the major scale something like lydian or mixolydian or locrian.

So by learning this pattern of half steps and whole steps Ups and training your fingers to go through those you're going to be doing yourself. A lot of favors.

Pretty much your ear is going to start training itself to hear those jumps and what it sounds like to jump a half step in a whole step and you're really linking that the memory between your ear and your fingers. So it's excellent excellent practice and I want to remind you that you know in any key we can do this is to start on the right note and go through those series of whole steps and half steps and as a guitar player side note, you can do both notes at the same time. It's pretty frequent thing is to play octaves. So like years old. The way the a we started on but here's the high above it Fifth fret on the first string and if you put your fingers in just the right configuration, you can play both of those notes at the same time and you can get these octave slides which is a nice little Jazzy move, you know, as a little bit of different tone in there when you're playing leads. So it's a little harder because you're coordinating two fingers at the same time, but it all goes back to just know what your scales. All right and you know and knowing scale shapes is very important, but it's also important to kind of know your scales on one string.

So I hope this helps and I hope you found it interesting.

Thank you for watching.

 





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