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Train Your Ear - Intervals on Guitar - Minor 2nd

Our very first interval is our smallest interval. It is the smallest distance you can travel between two notes and it's called a minor second a minor second on my guitar would look very simple. I just pick any fret today. I'll pick the seventh fret on the first string. That's a b and if I just play the note next door right there on the 8th fret that is a minor second in Germany.


Transcription

 Please note, this transcription was computer generated and has not been checked for errors.  However, I do hope you find it helpful.   

Be sure to check out The Ultimate Modal Poster!

Our very first interval is our smallest interval. It is the smallest distance you can travel between two notes and it's called a minor second a minor second on my guitar would look very simple. I just pick any fret today. I'll pick the seventh fret on the first string. That's a b and if I just play the note next door right there on the 8th fret that is a minor second in Germany.

We can do that on other strings as well. We can start down here. That's a Miner's on a guitar though. There is another way to play A Minor second intervals to let these notes ring into one another it's going to create an awesome dissonant sound. What I'll do is I'll put my pinky on the the low string. All right on the seventh fret and that is a b and if I want to play that next door notes see I can find that on the fifth string. It's is quite a stretch here. I'm going to have to stretch my first finger all the way over to this see which is four Frets backwards. So basically if I want to play minor seconds as a guitar player I could just do this right next to each other or I could go this elaborate route of putting my pinky on a no and then dropping four Frets back onto the next string and getting that nose grind. You hear what that sounds like when those two notes run into each other when you talk about that song, but basically I can do that again on these two strings to produce a minor second. I can do it on these two strings to produce a minor second on the next two strings though. I have to bring that first finger in so it's only a 3 fret Gap.

That's my minor second. And then when I get back to the first two strings, I do that big jump as well.

This is some really ugly sounding stuff. I mean if you hear what those two notes sound like next to each other that is awesomely dissonant. All right, and I do want to talk a little bit about the way this this interval feels. I think it's a very distinct feeling it's very We close those two notes next to each other. You can hear that. They're closed. I mean try imagining a note in between those notes if you try singing the DC and if you try singing a note in between, BC be like there's there's really nothing there. Alright, so that should kind of indicate to you that you're dealing with a minor second. If you're hearing two tones that are so close to each other. You can't even Envision a note in between them.

Also this sense of anxiety and tension that comes from a minor second is easily exploitable. As a composer I did it a video not too long ago on spooky music theory and I talked about how Jaws the movie Jaws the theme song uses to create that impending doom. So if you're a metal player, obviously, this is going to be one of those notes that you're going to be using a lot one of those intervals you're going to be using a lot and in the high register here. If I do that stretch again where I'm doing four Frets back on these first two strings that high-pitched minor second is wonderful. If you're into dissonant atonal music you combine that with Some Paul mutes.

You're going to get some pretty cool alarming sounding stuff. All right, so where do we actually hear it outside of Jaws? Well Jaws is going to be pretty much the best example I can give for you and I think that this one is so distinct and so unique that you really don't have to worry about other song examples to identify the minor second, but I still want you to test your ear by playing a note and envisioning What a minor second would sound like after it. So this note is an a doesn't matter. What note is all that matters is can I hear what? This note would sound like before I even play it. So I'm going to sing this note and I'm going to imagine what it would sound like if I went up a half step.

So it's pretty close. Right? And that's an excellent test is actually use your voice to sing your guesstimation your guess of what that next notes going to be then play it and see if you were right or not and that feedback loop of fayaz to Sharp. I was too flat. I was singing too high that's going to be one of the methods you're going to be using to really nail these intervals into place. All right. So that's all I've got to say about the minor second. We will move onto the major second.

 





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